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From The Diamond Blog...

Why Diamonds Are Used In Engagement And Wedding Rings

In celebration of those loving couples who are about to tie the knot, we offer this wonderful exploration of why diamonds are used for the purpose of engagement and wedding rings. The practice wasn't always so. Many factors came to influence this now common practice, none the least of which was profit. But let's start at the beginning.

The diamond's moniker is derived from the Greek word adamas, a word meaning “unconquerable"; befitting for a stone that holds the highest position for hardness on the Mohs scale and one in which can stand the test of time to symbolize love. Today a man presents his prospective bride with an engagement ring upon acceptance of his marriage proposal. Anthropologists believe this tradition originated from a Roman custom in which wives wore rings attached to small keys, indicating their husbands' ownership.

Read more: Why Diamonds Are Used In Engagement And Wedding Rings

Three Things the Diamond Trade’s Survival Depends On

According to Avi Krawitz at diamonds.net, the diamond industry is waking up to a new reality. Not only are the banks insisting on stricter compliance standards and pipeline integrity, but the largest mining companies and jewelry retailers are rapidly following suit. This is forcing the industry to rethink the way it conducts business so that ‘transparency, responsibility and sustainability’ are engrained in the ethos of the trade. 

It was therefore no coincidence those three concepts formed the central theme of the World Diamond Congress recently held in Dubai. “These themes run through all the challenges we’re facing as a global industry and also show us the way forward,” Ernie Blom, president of the World Federation of Diamond Bourses (WFDB), said in his opening remarks at the congress, a joint meeting of the WFDB and the International Diamond Manufacturers Association (IDMA).

Read more: Three Things the Diamond Trade’s Survival Depends On

Natural vs Synthetic: De Beers Reputation Depends on Spotting the Difference

In nature it takes billions of years to produce a diamond, or a laboratory can grow one in days and to the untrained eye, it looks the same. For De Beers, telling the difference is fundamental to protecting its reputation as the world's leading diamond firm by value and holder of a roughly 30 percent share of the market for genuine rough diamonds. Barabra Lewis from Reutuers explains the challenges.

Read more: Natural vs Synthetic: De Beers Reputation Depends on Spotting the Difference

5 Jewelry Curse Stories: Diamonds Aren't Always A Girl's Best Friend

What does it take for a jewelry artifact, whether it be a single stone or a hoard of gold, to be declared “cursed”? Well, it seems the main ingredient is a populace with a very active imagination, and successive owners who are willing to carry on the legend even if they’ve escaped with all their limbs. Here is a great piece by JR Thorpe from Bustle about the 5 Strangest Jewelry Curse Stories.

Read more: 5 Jewelry Curse Stories: Diamonds Aren't Always A Girl's Best Friend

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